About

When the London Food Bank was first started in 1986, co-directors Jane Roy and Glen Pearson determined that it should be largely volunteer-run and fully transparent to the community at large. Now in its 35th year, the Food Bank continues to flourish specifically because of its great volunteers, a committed staff, and a community that continues to donate supplies year after year. The London Food Bank is an important part of this functioning city and we invite you to explore more of how we function and who we serve.

The London & Area Food Bank was officially incorporated on January 1, 1987. It is a non-profit, charitable organization, governed by a community board of directors. There are six full-time and two part-time paid staff.

Mission

Our mission is to help a generous community share its food resources.

Mandate

There are two parts to our mandate:

  • To act as a front-line agency assisting those struggling to make ends meet
  • To act as a food warehouse and work with other agencies that assist people in need

Objectives

The London Food Bank has nine major objectives:

  1. To distribute food and food-related products to those requiring assistance
  2. To accept donations of food and food-related products
  3. To accept donations of money or other property
  4. To collect, inspect, and store items for distribution
  5. To co-operate with other organizations that have similar objectives
  6. To serve as a common contact point for various and diverse segments of the London community
  7. To reduce the stress on social service agencies and churches by providing co-ordination and support in the distribution of food stuffs
  8. To ensure that support and information are consistently available, to help guarantee the appropriateness of emergency programs
  9. To work with other groups towards a solution to the problem of poverty in Canada

Ethics

We are members of the Feed Ontario and Food Banks Canada. We have signed and adhere to the code of ethics of both organizations.

Agencies we help

We help more than 25 other groups and agencies:

  • Other food banks such as the Salvation Army, St. Paul’s Social Services, Men’s Mission, White Oaks United Church, Chalmers Presbyterian Church
  • Residential programs such as Anova, Unity Project
  • Meal programs such as school breakfast programs operated through the Children’s Nutrition Network, Memorial Boys’ & Girls’ Club, the network of early childhood education programs operated through Kids Count, St. Joseph’s Hospitality Centre, Youth Action Centre, Regional HIV/AIDS Connection, N’Amerind Friendship Centre, Growing Chefs! Ontario
  • Community resource centres in Glen Cairn, Crouch, South London, NorthWest London
  • Acting as a regional hub for the Feed Ontario, distributing corporate donations to food banks in Ailsa Craig, Goderich, Ingersoll, Stratford, Strathroy, St. Marys, and St. Thomas